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SANDY AND SOUTH JORDAN SCHOOLS HEAD LICE POLICIES

SANDY AND SOUTH JORDAN SCHOOLS HEAD LICE POLICIES
Updated on 
January 28, 2020

Schools in Sandy, Utah in the Canyon School District adhere to recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) and do not have a “no nit” school” lice policy. Schools in the Jordan School District do not have a “no nit” school lice policy. However, students found with live bugs can return to school the following day after treatment.

 

Sandy Schools

“Any student with live lice or nits within ¼ -inch of the scalp may remain in school until the end of the day (see Procedures). Immediate treatment at home is advised. The student will be readmitted to school after initial treatment and examination. If, upon examination, the school-designated personnel find no live lice on the child, the child may reenter the school. The child should not be out of school for longer than 24 hours.”

 

 

South Jordan Schools

“Head Lice Management Protocol Jordan School District Revised November 2015

Head Lice is a fairly common problem in school-age children and it can be found anywhere in the community. It is a nuisance and is an inconvenience, but does not cause disease nor is it a serious medical condition. The following guidelines are in line with the Utah Health Department.

  1. The school may identify staff or volunteers responsible for lice checks, screening and follow up.
  2. Nurses will provide training to staff and volunteers at the request of the Principal.
  3. Nurses are available for education and consultation.
  4. The health department does not recommend routine checks or mass screenings.
  5. Lice information packets and sample letters will be given to each school.
  6. Letters may be used at the Principal’s discretion.
  7. If a case of lice is suspected, the child may be screened school personnel.
  8. What to do when live lice are found on the child’s head or a parent calls with lice concerns.
  9. Talk with the parents and alleviate their concerns.
  10. Ask the parents if the child has been treated with lice shampoo within the last seven days. If the answer is no, continue with steps that follow. If the answer is yes, skip to #2.
  11. Send the child home with instructions to the parent for shampooing with approved lice shampoo and for cleaning the environment.
  12. Emphasize to parents the importance of combing out nits from the hair on a daily basis and observing for any signs of new infestation.
  13. Instruct the parents to check all other household members for lice and treat if necessary.
  14. If the classroom has rugs and upholstered furniture, instruct the custodial staff to vacuum the furniture and rugs carefully. Pillows and stuffed animals should be double bagged for two weeks. If computer headphones are involved, thoroughly clean them.
  15. If several cases of head lice are identified in one classroom, the children may be encouraged to put coats and head wear into their backpacks or into plastic bags provided by the school. Students may also place their coats and backpacks behind their chairs.
  16. Teachers should periodically emphasize the importance of “keeping personal things personal” (not sharing head wear, coats, scarves, combs and brushes or hair ornaments) and keeping hands away from each other’s hair.
  17. What to do when live lice are found and your child has been treated with lice shampoo within the last seven days.
  18. Notify parents.
  19. Suggest alternative methods of removing the live lice, such as removing them by hand or with a lice comb.
  20. Remind the parent to screen daily and comb to remove nits. Nit removal is very important – if there are no nits, there will be no lice.
  21. Suggest the parent re-clean the environment, paying particular attention to bedding and upholstered furniture.
  22. If live lice are still seen after seven days, recommend retreating with lice shampoo following the manufacturer’s directions. Emphasize the importance of not retreating with lice shampoo less than seven (7) days from the last lice shampoo treatment.”
  1. Nurses will provide training to staff and volunteers at the request of the Principal.
  2. Nurses are available for education and consultation.
  3. The health department does not recommend routine checks or mass screenings.
  4. Lice information packets and sample letters will be given to each school.
  5. Letters may be used at the Principal’s discretion.
  1. What to do when live lice are found on the child’s head or a parent calls with lice concerns.
  2. Talk with the parents and alleviate their concerns.
  3. Ask the parents if the child has been treated with lice shampoo within the last seven days. If the answer is no, continue with steps that follow. If the answer is yes, skip to #2.
  4. Send the child home with instructions to the parent for shampooing with approved lice shampoo and for cleaning the environment.
  5. Emphasize to parents the importance of combing out nits from the hair on a daily basis and observing for any signs of new infestation.
  6. Instruct the parents to check all other household members for lice and treat if necessary.
  7. If the classroom has rugs and upholstered furniture, instruct the custodial staff to vacuum the furniture and rugs carefully. Pillows and stuffed animals should be double bagged for two weeks. If computer headphones are involved, thoroughly clean them.
  8. If several cases of head lice are identified in one classroom, the children may be encouraged to put coats and head wear into their backpacks or into plastic bags provided by the school. Students may also place their coats and backpacks behind their chairs.
  9. Teachers should periodically emphasize the importance of “keeping personal things personal” (not sharing head wear, coats, scarves, combs and brushes or hair ornaments) and keeping hands away from each other’s hair.
  10. What to do when live lice are found and your child has been treated with lice shampoo within the last seven days.
  11. Notify parents.
  12. Suggest alternative methods of removing the live lice, such as removing them by hand or with a lice comb.
  13. Remind the parent to screen daily and comb to remove nits. Nit removal is very important – if there are no nits, there will be no lice.
  14. Suggest the parent re-clean the environment, paying particular attention to bedding and upholstered furniture.
  15. If live lice are still seen after seven days, recommend retreating with lice shampoo following the manufacturer’s directions. Emphasize the importance of not retreating with lice shampoo less than seven (7) days from the last lice shampoo treatment.”
  1. Talk with the parents and alleviate their concerns.
  2. Ask the parents if the child has been treated with lice shampoo within the last seven days. If the answer is no, continue with steps that follow. If the answer is yes, skip to #2.
  3. Send the child home with instructions to the parent for shampooing with approved lice shampoo and for cleaning the environment.
  4. Emphasize to parents the importance of combing out nits from the hair on a daily basis and observing for any signs of new infestation.
  5. Instruct the parents to check all other household members for lice and treat if necessary.
  6. If the classroom has rugs and upholstered furniture, instruct the custodial staff to vacuum the furniture and rugs carefully. Pillows and stuffed animals should be double bagged for two weeks. If computer headphones are involved, thoroughly clean them.
  7. If several cases of head lice are identified in one classroom, the children may be encouraged to put coats and head wear into their backpacks or into plastic bags provided by the school. Students may also place their coats and backpacks behind their chairs.
  8. Teachers should periodically emphasize the importance of “keeping personal things personal” (not sharing head wear, coats, scarves, combs and brushes or hair ornaments) and keeping hands away from each other’s hair.
  1. Notify parents.
  2. Suggest alternative methods of removing the live lice, such as removing them by hand or with a lice comb.
  3. Remind the parent to screen daily and comb to remove nits. Nit removal is very important – if there are no nits, there will be no lice.
  4. Suggest the parent re-clean the environment, paying particular attention to bedding and upholstered furniture.
  5. If live lice are still seen after seven days, recommend retreating with lice shampoo following the manufacturer’s directions. Emphasize the importance of not retreating with lice shampoo less than seven (7) days from the last lice shampoo treatment.”

Source: Jordan SD Lice Protocol

After a treatment with one of our experienced technicians your child is guaranteed to be able to return to school – no sweat! Call LiceDoctors in Sandy and South Jordan and speak with one of our knowledgeable dispatchers at 801-477-4730. You will be relieved the moment you do!

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