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Chandler School Head Lice Policy

Chandler School Head Lice Policy
Updated on 
May 2, 2019

Schools in the Chandler area, including Queen Creek, do not hold a strict “no-nit” policy; instead they have a “no-live lice” policy. This means that once a child has begun treatment and no live bugs are present, they will be allowed to attend school, even if nits or eggs remain.

Chandler Unified School District

Pediculosis

Lice is a common infectious disease just like the cold or flu virus. Lice do not discriminate and anyone can get it, however, it is most common in school-age and pre-school children and their family members.  Lice are usually transmitted by person-to-person contact, therefore most transmissions occur outside the school setting.   CUSD has a “no-live lice” policy. Students with live lice will be required to go home from school for treatment and will be screened in the health office upon their return to school after treatment. Students with nits are recommended to go home from school and will be screened in the health office upon return to school after treatment. This policy was set forth by the CUSD Health Services Department and governing board. As of July 29, 2014, CUSD no longer does school classroom screens or school-wide screening. This decision was made based on the findings from professional associations such as The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Click here for the American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report on head lice

Student’s hair will be examined at school by the health office if a teacher or staff member believes the child is showing signs/symptoms of a possible infestation. However, it is advised that parent(s)/guardian(s) should be screening their child’s hair on a regular basis for early detection, treatment, and prevention of spread to others. Just as they would for any virus, infection, health concern or injury. If a parent/guardian detects lice on their child, they should call the school's health office to report it. The child should be brought to the school's health office BEFORE school so the child’s head can be examined BEFORE they return to class to avoid the child having to be called out of class. It is up to the parent to notify parents/guardians of other children who may have come into contact with their child while they may have been infested. Please view the link above, Head Lice in the Community, regarding CUSD recommendations on how to detect and treat a lice infestation. If you have any concerns regarding treatments, chemicals, failed treatment….please contact your healthcare provider. Please call the health office or CUSD Health Services department for any questions or concerns. Source: Chandler USD Health Office

Head lice no longer carries the stigma it once did, but it is usually still a very stressful time for a family. Let LiceDoctors alleviate that stress by sending a trained professional to eradicate the lice and give you peace of mind. Call 602-753-0289 today.

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